About your Search

20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8
of the u.s. senate. on nights watched key public policy this. and every week in the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedules at our website, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> the programs that we had all under -- >> we are live now as u.s. chamber of commerce is hosting a quarterly briefing today on the outlook for the u.s. economy. martin regalia, chambers chief economist will talk about recent gross domestic product figure and what policy the obama administration and congress to propose to help stimulate the economy. this is just getting under way. >> a prime example of our ability to involve experts and debates on topics that are critical to the business community. i'm going to start us off today by queuing a video from christopher giancarlo of the gfi group, our sponsor, for this series. but for some want to make a brief announcement. this series, this economic series that we pose every quarter, has been accredited by the national association of state boards of accountancy to provide continuing prof
to undertake a better prepare for defense against a threat to u.s. territory because of this coming capability, i think china is going to say that's unacceptable. i'm hopeful. but at the end of the day as i say, the united states can't sit there waiting just for china. we have to work with our allies on a comprehensive strategy, again trying to let the region know that we want to be that important security guarantor. we also want to be a major trader, an investor to the region and with asia-pacific. and for the stability and the trade and investment, for prosperity and liberty to take root in this century, in a dynamic century with a rising asia pacific, it's going to have to take greater stability than north korea is right now letting it have. so with those initial comment, i'll turn it back to our chairman. >> well, thank you, patrick. as always, very comprehensive argument. now, the floor is open. before we open the floor -- [inaudible] >> i want to pick up on patrick's point, and elaborate on what i see as the elephant in the room, which is china. outgoing defense secretary panetta told th
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
about how the project is crucial to u.s. energy security. working with canada for our energy rather than getting it from the middle east. the letter talks about thousands of jobs at the -- that the project creates, not only building this $7 billion pipeline but that all the jobs that go to the refineries and the other activities that go with it and talks about safety, efficiency and reliability. now, the letter concludes mr. president, we consider the keystone x.l. pipeline fundamentally important to the future economic prosperity of both the united states and canada. we strongly urge you to issue a presidential permit and act swiftly to approve the keystone x.l. pipeline, signed by governors -- now, remember, senator baucus and i have been working on the effort on behalf of montana. you have got nebraska here. governor heineman just sent a letter in. now here are some of the other governors on this letter. sam brownback from kansas, the governors of north dakota and south dakota, governor mary fallon from oklahoma, governor rick perry from texas. in addition to other governors that aren
:00 eastern and our companion network, c-span. the u.s. senate is not in today as democrats and republicans continue their policy retreat. lawmakers will return tomorrow at 9:30 a.m. to continue work on a bill to reauthorize and the violence against women act. you can see this and that live here on c-span2. the u.s. house is in session. members passed a bill requiring president obama to submit a balanced budget to congress. the vote was 253-167. the house is done with less with a work for the wheat. members will be out the next couple of days. democratic members can attend their retreat. follow live on c-span when members return next week. coming up, live as a group of republican national security leaders from the house and senate armed services committee holds a press briefing to discuss averting defense sequestration. live coverage at 145 eastern here on c-span2. until then, yesterday a bipartisan group of house members introduced a new bill that would make gun trafficking a federal crime. that would also penalize straw purchasers who buy guns for convicted felons are prohibited from buyi
for the world innovation. they are a big part of why the u.s. remains the destination for the world's best and brightest. investment in education leads to innovation, which leads to more opportunity and jobs for all. our problem? the investment we make is not yielding maximum returns. each year our colleges and universities graduate approximately 40,000 foreign nationals with masters and ph.d degrees, many of whom are then forced to leave the kanji because there are not enough visa slots in the immigration system to permit them to stay. so rather than being able to invent things here in america, grow businesses or start one of their own, they do all these things somewhere else. now, fiona zhou is here with us today. she is earning her master's at gw school of engineering and applied science. originally from china, she's been india united states for five years, studying operations research and the systems engineering department. if you talk to her you will see, she's pretty smart. she would like to stay here. she wants to invest her talents in america, and maybe even start her own company.
of technology and innovation to george carruthers, u.s. naval research lab, for invention of the far uv in electric graphic camera, which significantly improved our understanding of space and earth science. [applause] >> robert langer. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to robert langer, massachusetts institute of technology, for inventions and discoveries that led to the development of controlled drug release systems, engineered tissues, and you inhibit or is a new biomaterials. [applause] [laughter] [applause] >> norman r. mccombs. [applause] 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to norman r. mccombs, for the development and commercialization of precious wing adsorption oxygen supply system with a wide range of medical and industrial applications that have led to improved health and substantially reduce health care costs. [applause] >> gholam a. peyman. [applause] >> 2011 national medal of technology and innovation to gholam a. peyman, university of arizona college of medicine and arizona retinal specialist, for invention of the lasik surgical te
as u.s. story ?o are, is to -- senator, is to visit our courthouses where immigration and naturalization ceremonies take place. those ceremonies are profoundly inspiring because they come, new citizens, people about to become citizens, with their families. it is a day of joy and pride unmatched, and unexcelled in their lives. they come with friends and they come to celebrate with their friends and families. with tears in their eyes and their hearts and their throats, and there is no time that i have seen one of these ceremonies when i haven't been deeply moved and uplifted. if you ever have a down day, if you ever are discouraged about this nation, see one of these ceremonies. you will know what it means to be a citizen of the united states of america and how important it is and how important we should hard it. so i -- should regard it. so i approach immigration reform with appreciation of its importance to people who seek liberty and justice in this great land but also how we are enriched as a nation of immigrants by the diversity, the talent, the dedication they brin
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8